Make Sure the Sign You Carry is Correct

Dwight Hunter,  Chattanooga State Technical Community College, TN
 few months ago, a protest march was held in Washington, D.C.  I was 
standing on the corner of 10th and K streets and about ready to cross
the intersection to go to the Hard Rock Café.  But the protest march 
with a block long line of people holding placards and banners made their 
way down 10th Street.  Across the street from the Hard Rock Café, I saw 
the FBI building.

The march was a protest of police brutality.  Not that I could blame
them; shooting an unarmed guy 40 plus times in the back isn't being nice 
nor professional.

So, the usual signs were upheld like Protest Police Brutality, and other 
signs had pictures of other victims from the D.C. area.  A group of 
first-graders from the local school was in the protest march.  I thought 
that was, at least, very educational--teaching how to protest with
civility.

But then there was a seemingly out-of-place sign.  On a white
background with blue letters, the words of the sign screamed More Money 
for Schools, Not for Jails.

Why did this person carry this sign in a police brutality protest march?  
What made this person do what he was doing?

Perhaps, the reasoning was that if schools were built; there would be
fewer people wanting to be trained as police officers.  Maybe, money poured
into schools would train more intelligent police officers.  But what does
either question have to do with money for jails.

Perhaps, the sign-holder believed in the fallacy that more money would 
improve schools, and those better schools would lead to a better
education and better education would lead to fewer people in jail.

But that is tough logic to follow.

No, he just wanted to be in the march.  So, he carried a sign no matter
how out of place or wrong it was.